Conscience and cowardice are really the same thing.

Conscience and cowardice are really the same thing.

I never take any notice of what common people say, and I never interfere with what charming people say.

I never take any notice of what common people say, and I never interfere with what charming people say.

TRASH TALK: HISTORY IN ASSEMBLAGE
Jim Condron

June 7 to November 10, 2019

Opening Reception: Friday, June 7, 2019
5 - 9 PM during Art Loop

Trash Talk: History in Assemblage, explores the ephemeral and oftentimes overlooked materials of life that one chooses to give significance to and collect. Working in the modern mode of assemblage inspired by twentieth-century artists such as John Chamberlain, Pablo Picasso, and Marcel Duchamp, Baltimore artist Jim Condron follows the tradition of using found and unconventional materials.

Over 40 sculptures and mixed media work incorporate traditional materials like paint, metal, and wood with repurposed animal fur, foam, and trash. These combined materials prompt feelings of nostalgia, remorse, and repression simultaneously with ideas of chance, revival, and vitality.

Applying titles the same way he assembles materials, Condron ascribes each piece with a textual fragment from a story that adds to the works' rhetoric, rather than naming or defining it. They contain phrases from literature that resonate with the artist, appropriated from an array of great authors such as Don DeLillo, James Salter, Anton Chekhov, Nikolai Gogol, Oscar Wilde, Hunter Thompson, Kurt Vonnegut, Ernest Hemmingway, Henry Miller, and Anais Nin.

Works such as, She started a new job for which she was radically overqualified and underpaid give viewers a better sense of Condron's humor, operating in tandem with the intimacy of personal memory. Lite Brite pegs, relics of the mid-twentieth century, are resurrected to be in conversation with organic materials like wool and felt. Condron rescues otherwise abandoned objects and materials and imbues them with purpose. In this process of "reincarnation", Condron breathes new life into his salvaged objects and transforms the irreverent and irreclaimable into the ineffable. His paintings are richly layered and teeming with vibrant swathes of color. They evoke a certain feeling of pride in the visual attempt to capture the fleetingness of creative mania.

Jim Condron is a recipient of the Pollock-Krasner Foundation Grant in 2017 and earned his MFA at the Hoffberger School of Painting at the Maryland Institute College of Art. He holds a BA in Art and English from Colby College. In addition, he has studied at the New York Studio School of Drawing, Painting, and Sculpture. He has exhibited in galleries and museums both nationally and internationally and his works are held in corporate, university, public, and private collections around the world. He currently serves on the faculty at Loyola University.

-Michelle Dao, Curatorial Assistant